9.19.2007

Sedum: The Plant I Have Learned to Love

When I first started landscaping and flower gardening I just didn't like sedum. I don't know why. The previous owners of my house had overused it quite a bit. Maybe that was it. I gave all mine away to my mom. Arriving at her house a few years later while my fledgling flower beds were bare, she had showy, yellow flowers trailing over flower beds that were gorgeous. They were the sedum plants I had given her. My opinion of sedum changed.
I have a particular affection for Autumn Joy sedum which is just opening up now in one garden. Ground cover sedum has been planted in many places around the yard as fillers. This sedum is pretty, require very little water, and spreads quickly. They are easily divided and can be shared or moved when they are young. In the picture above you will see an old bird bath that we had a hard time with. When the water was clean, the cats taunted the birds. When the water got dirty it just looked unappealing. Now it is a sedum container garden. It is the best thing that ever happened to that bird bath. If you haven't tried different varieties of sedum, they are a hardy, no fail plant for the growing seasons of the year.

8 comments:

  1. Sedum's are lovely! I was abit like you --- not really liking them. But my mother collected many varieties in abundance. She and her gardening buddies would share plants and talk about the latest sedum they'd found. They find wild ones in the woods too, and try to get them to root in their home gardens. Over time I developed a real appreciation for them --- and enjoy them to this day.

    I enjoyed your post very much! Thank you!

    LaTeaDah

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  2. "My opinion of sedum changed."

    my opinions do that too..

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  3. I'm catching up from being away and your post were lovely. I enjoyed my visit. ;)

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  4. I'm glad you told me what those were called - I've been seeing them around in neighbor's gardens, and didn't know what to call them!

    And if it's "hardy and no fail," then it's for me, the original black thumb :)

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  5. It's a funny thing about Sedum. I felt the same way as you, but now I'm really loving the different varieties and the late color. I especially love my dish garden that our daughter and her boyfriend gave me for my birthday. It has 7 varieties in it, plus fameflower, which is related to Portulacas.
    I have 2 Stonecrop Sedums that are giving me much pleasure at the moment. Lovely colors!
    Your last rose is gorgeous!
    That sure is beautiful country you live in! Glad to hear school is going well.

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  6. Ditto for me about the sedum but age does bring some reason with it, doesn't it. One day I was delighted to see that one of the pink variety forms a heart shaped cluster. After that I saw them through different eyes.

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  7. I am glad so many of you share my love for sedum. Trust me Becca... you can grow sedum! Kerry... I loved the new colors on your blog. I had never seen that beautiful variety.
    Noni: I do think it is age. We see things through different eyes for sure.

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  8. I'd never heard of or to my knowledge seen sedum before a few weeks ago when I bought an Autumn Joy at the grocery store. I was desperate to see a bit of color, not having had flowers all summer-except for a few brave shasta daisies and the four-o'clocks that seemed to like the drought conditions (with watering). It stayed green for so long my mom thought it was dead, but it's started sprouting pink flowers. And when I was planting it in a container, a piece broke off and I stuck it in the flowerbed, without much hope that it would survive, but it did, much to my delight, and it's starting to show pink. I think I'll try to find some in yellow.

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